Why Hire an Interior Designer?

 

I will obviously go into the detail...but in brief it will save you time and money on poor decisions.

That's it.

 Before

 

However I shall elaborate. We are a time poor society paying for help is the norm whether a cleaner, child care, tutors, gardeners, window cleaners, internet grocery shopping. Don’t be fooled that every purchase you make from both the product and service industry is that of time. When you order an Uber you're not just ordering a taxi journey, you're saving yourself the ten minutes of waiting for a bus! It's absolutely no different when considering your home.

 

 After

 

We outsource for every area of your life... why not interior design for your home? The place where you invest a lot of time and money. It's important your space reflects your personality and you feel you can kick back and relax (not have the job constantly on the list!). Think of how you feel in your favourite pub or hotel (or even a friend's home). It may look casually curated but I doubt that was the case. There really is a level of expertise that goes into your favourite places. Most of which has had an experts' hand.

 

 

Has anyone left the house for an Ikea trip with the promise of a Scandinavian boudoir, a Dime cake and some meatballs only to come home to three days of flat pack and marital disharmony? (Or is that just me?) Life simply is too short for this and in the end your time and energy is better spent letting an expert take the strain. It's not just about time it's also about waste and bad decisions. Making the wrong decision on a bathroom tile for example will haunt you everyday. ”I shouldn't have rushed that decision, I should have spent a bit more, I knew the tiles were too shiny"....it goes on). Having expert advice on the quality and proportion of products will save you many hours of research and ensure you have something that will look great (and not date).

 

 

Interior Designers can also negotiate trade discounts on your behalf making the prices comparable to what you would have paid for a mediocre product on the high street. And perhaps the most important of all they will tell you the truth and can collate a scheme around some of your existing pieces to provide synergy not just in the room in question but throughout the house.

 

 

So when considering your next refurb or decorating project consider thinking how much money you would save by paying an interior designer a % of the final spend. I’m certain you’ll reap the benefits for years to come.

 

My five top tips...

  1. Start collating mood boards on Pinterest, Houzz or Instagram. By simply saving a few pictures every week you’ll soon see a theme develop, even if you think you have no idea what you want.

  2. How many rooms need a rethink? Would it be beneficial to consider redesigning/configuring the rooms at the same time? This may help with budgeting, tradesmen and synergy within the scheme.

  3. When looking for a designer it's like anything else, a mutual taste level and rapport when you speak or meet in person. View designers' portfolios online, no two are the same. Houzz or here at IDC are a great one stop shop! Arrange a few calls or meetings on site to get a feel of taste, level and working relationship.

  4. Check out how others rate the designer or builder. Word of mouth and online reviews are imperative in service based industries.

  5. Once you've established your chosen designer/tradesperson be clear in your brief and direction. Once the trust is established they will run with your vision and create a space you're proud to call home.

HUGE thanks to Lisa Mettis from Born & Bred Studio for such an amazing post. I couldn't have said it better myself. Have you ever worked with an interior designer? What was your experience? And if not, would it be something you'd consider now?

 

All images courtesy of Lisa Mettis.

 

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